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Automobile Accidents

What should I do if I’m in a car accident?

I was in a minor accident and the other driver and I just exchanged insurance information without calling the police. My insurance company is now giving me a hard time for not having a report. Is a police report necessary for all car accidents?

I was in a car accident and the other motorist's insurance company just called me for a statement. Am I required to provide one?

Who is responsible for my medical treatment and expenses?

The accident was partly my fault. Do I still have a case?

The accident was my friend or family member’s fault. If I sue them, will it cost them money?

What is no-fault insurance?

What does no-fault cover?

How much is my case worth?





Q: What should I do if I’m in a car accident?

If you are involved in a car accident, you should seek necessary medical treatment immediately. Even if you are not injured, it is important that you call the police and file a formal police report which can later assist with insurance claims and any lawsuits which may follow.

During this time, you will be required to show your driver’s license and documentation of your insurance coverage. It is important that you obtain this information from the other driver as well. If you have a camera, you should take a photo of the scene or soon after to show any damage to your vehicle. You should also contact your insurance carrier as soon as possible so they can instruct you on the necessary steps to file your claim.

To ensure that you receive the greatest settlement possible, contact a personal injury attorney who can initiate an investigation before witnesses forget their testimonials and evidence is lost.


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Q: I was in a minor accident and the other driver and I just exchanged insurance information without calling the police. My insurance company is now giving me a hard time for not having a report. Is a police report necessary for all car accidents?

It is always a good idea to call the police at the time of an automobile accident. Although all insurance carriers have different policies regarding the necessity of a police report when filing a claim, many will accept an auto insurance claim without one. Nonetheless, police reports are helpful in determining the involved parties and documenting who was at fault. This information will assist your insurance company in their investigation and may expedite the resolution of the claim.


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Q: I was in a car accident and the other motorist's insurance company just called me for a statement. Am I required to provide one?

Absolutely not! More often than not, the other driver’s insurance company is calling to obtain information which can be used against you as you seek to recover losses. Respectfully decline their request and inform them that if they would like a copy of your statement, they may contact your insurance carrier directly.


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Q: Who is responsible for my medical treatment and expenses?

In most cases, the at-fault party and/or their respective insurance providers are responsible to pay for medical treatment and other expenses such as vehicle damage. However, fiscal responsibility for injury resulting from a car accident varies significantly from state to state. As a result, it is crucial that you contact a local law firm who can help you determine fault and recover any financial losses you’ve incurred.


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Q: The accident was partly my fault. Do I still have a case?

If you have been injured in a car accident, a construction accident, or a slip and fall, you might wonder if you have a personal injury case. In New York State, even if you are partially at fault, you may be entitled to compensation. You need to consult with an experienced attorney to have your case properly evaluated.


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Q: The accident was my friend or family member’s fault. If I sue them, will it cost them money?

If you fell at a family member’s house, or were a passenger in a friend’s car, you may be apprehensive about filing a claim. Rest assured that automobile insurance and homeowner’s insurance will cover most claims.  The insurance company will even provide your friend or family member with an attorney, free of charge, as part of the insurance coverage.


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Q: What is no-fault insurance?

No-fault insurance is part of the vehicle owner’s insurance coverage that pays all bills for medical treatment for anyone who is injured as the result of a car collision. The no-fault insurer must pay all bills, as soon as treatment begins, without delay, no matter who caused the accident. A medical office or hospital that does not know which insurer to bill will most likely send you their bill directly. Therefore, you should inform all health care providers that you were injured as the result of a car accident and that there is No-Fault insurance available.


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Q: What does no-fault cover?

Usually, no-fault covers treatment for about two months. It covers visits to physicians such as chiropractors, orthopedists, neurologists, the emergency room, and testing such as MRI and CT scans. It also allows a small amount daily to cover other expenses, such as transportation to and from medical appointments.


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Q: How much is my case worth?

Every case is different. Many questions must be answered to make that determination. Whose fault was the accident?  How serious are the injuries? Are there lasting effects? Is there enough insurance coverage? These are just some of the factors that must be evaluated by a competent and experienced attorney to properly evaluate your case.


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